Blog

Health Ministry News for 2/27/2022

Health Ministry Contacts

•          Health Ministry – Bev Wilkerson 660-473-2033

•          Bereavement Ministry – Ann Dove 660-527-3794

            Take Them a Meal – Marge Wehman 724-448-4482

•          Prayer Shawl Ministry – Rectory at 827-2311

•          Crochet & Sewing Tuesdays – Carol Schibi 660-620-3795

High blood pressure is a “silent killer”(from AHA)

  • Most of the time there are no obvious symptoms.
  • Certain physical traits  can put you at a greater risk for high blood pressure. These are family history, age, gender, race, and chronic kidney disease.
  • When left untreated, the damage that high blood pressure does to your circulatory system is a significant contributing factor to heart attack, and stroke.

Modifiable risk factors

These are the risk factors you can change to help prevent and manage high blood pressure, including:

  • Lack of physical activity: Not getting enough physical activity as part of your lifestyle increases your risk of getting high blood pressure.
  • An unhealthy diet, especially one high in sodium:
  • Being overweight or obese: Carrying too much weight puts an extra strain on your heart and circulatory system that can cause serious health problems.
  • Drinking too much alcohol: Regular, heavy use of alcohol can cause many health problems, including heart failurestroke and an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia). 
  • Sleep apnea: Obstructive sleep apnea may increase risk of developing HBP and is common in people with resistant hypertension.
  • High cholesterol: More than half of people with HBP also have high cholesterol.
  • Diabetes: Most people with diabetes also develop HBP.
  • Smoking and tobacco use: Using tobacco can cause your blood pressure to temporarily increase and can contribute to damaged arteries.
  • Stress:  Too much stress may contribute to increased blood pressure. Also, too much stress can encourage behaviors that increase blood pressure, such as poor diet, physical inactivity, and using tobacco or drinking alcohol more than usual.